There's 11 in a Baker's Dozen (?)

You have to read till the end of the newsletter to get that reference.

Welcome to the Guelph Politico Tip Sheet, a twice-a-week newsletter meant to “tip” you off about some of the important stuff going on in the Royal City. It arrives directly in your inbox on Tuesdays and Fridays.

The six people competing to be the next leader of the Ontario Liberal Party were all in Guelph on Sunday afternoon for the first of six debates before the March 2020 leadership convention. The topic was small town and rural affairs as the candidates were asked about perspectives on the economy, education, and the environment. You can recap the live tweets or watch the original live stream on Guelph Politico.

The University of Guelph marked the 30th anniversary of the attack at L’École Polytechnique with a moving ceremony that saw 14 female engineering students lay white roses at the permanent memorial to the Montreal Massacre in the Thornbrough building. The U of G also announced a new initiative to promote and advance the work of women in engineering fields.

The City of Guelph is asking for help collecting non-perishable food and cash donations in support of the Guelph Food Bank. The eight annual “Stuff an Emergency Vehicle” event will take place at the Zehrs on Paisley Road from 9 am to 3 pm this Saturday.

Also in the News…

Animal rights activists with Guelph Cow Save and KW Animal Save protested in front of Cargill Meat Solutions on Monday to protest Bill 156, which is technically about increasing fines on people who trespass on farms, but animal rights advocates see it as an attack on their right to gather evidence of animal abuse.

A Guelph man was charged with two terrorism-related offences on Friday stemming from time he spent in Turkey. Ikar Mao, 22, was charged by the RCMP with participation in activity of terrorist group and leaving Canada to participate in activity of a terrorist group.

That weird smell in the river by the Royal Recreation Trail last February? That was 4.4 million litres of sewage that leaked out in a spill that’s believed to have been caused by two failed bypass pumps when construction was happening on nearby Armstrong Ave. The pumps and bypass pipes were replaced, and the incident is still under investigation.

The Politico Tip Sheet is open for anyone to subscribe, so if you know a friend or associate that might like to receive this newsletter, send it to them, and get them to click on the button below:

Guelph MP Lloyd Longfield asked about homelessness in the House yesterday.

Kansas City (the Missouri one, not the Kansas one) now has free transit after city council directed the city manager to spend $8 million to eliminate the $1.50 fare, and become the first U.S. city to make public transit free for all users. The move could save frequent users about $1,000 per year.  

Former Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne was on-hand for the official unveiling of her portrait at Queen’s Park last night. The portrait by artist Linda Kooluris-Dobbs features Wynne in a light pink suit and running shoes standing next to her former desk in the Premier’s office.

In case you missed it, you can hear Ward 3 Councillor Phil Allt’s appearance last week on Open Sources Guelph on the Guelph Politicast channel.

December 9 – Regular Council Meeting.

This meeting was straightforward. After passing the one consent agenda item for the Sign Bylaw Variance for 350 Speedvale Ave W, City Clerk Stephen O’Brien demonstrated for council the new and improved agenda management system, which will go into effect in January. The only real news came out of the closed meeting on the mandate for collective bargaining with the Canadian Union of Public Employees. Mayor Cam Guthrie said that council gave staff the clear direction to enter into a fair and reasonable negotiation where staff are compensated appropriately, but with a deal that’s still affordable for citizens.

December 9 – Planning Meeting.

Decision Report 1657 and 1665 Gordon Street Proposed Zoning By-law Amendment – Councillor Dominique O’Rourke had a couple of follow-up questions before council voted on the recommendation. She expressed concern about how the number of parking spaces had gone down while the number of units had gone up, but staff made the point it was to make more room for trees, and the development was still within bylaw on parking. Councillor Rodrigo Goller asked if there was a report done about whether staff engaged the developer about making some of the units affordable, and staff said they don’t require a report on a development this small. The decision was approved 12-1.

Statutory Public Meeting Report 1871-1879 Gordon Street Proposed Zoning By-law Amendment – Councillor O’Rourke expressed concerns about the shadow impact study on nearby Brock Road Nursery, but the architect for the project said the nursery will be unaffected. O’Rourke also asked if staff could update the transit plan for south of Poppy Drive before the decision report comes back to council.

Commercial Built Form Standards – Some on council expressed concerns about passing these new guidelines before the completion of the comprehensive zoning bylaw review, but staff said that  the approval of the guidelines is separate from implementation of the bylaw, and will provide discussion points for staff to carry on with the review, which is still a few year away from completion. Councillor Christine Billings suggested deferring the motion, but that vote was defeated 3-10.

Councillor Dan Gibson expressed concern about staff’s dealings with Loblaws, who sent notes in a nine-page letter with their thoughts on the standards. Staff said that they think Loblaws concerns were addressed in a one-on-one meeting, and they haven’t heard otherwise in a formal communique. Gibson urged caution with some of the standards outlined because suburban communities have been planned for 50 years with the car in mind, and they can’t be made walkable overnight. The standards were then approved 9-4.

December 11* – Special Council Meeting – Workshop on Transportation Master Plan and the Comprehensive Zoning Bylaw.

There will be no delegations at this meeting. Though it’s open to the public, this is a council workshop.

*Council goes on Christmas Break after this meeting. The next council meeting is Committee of the Whole on January 13.

The Guelph Coalition for Active Transportation is holding a Winter Cycling Workshop at 7 pm this Thursday at the Fixed Gear Brewing Company at 20 Alma Street.

Check out Ed Video’s Holiday Haunt this Friday at 404 York Road at 7 pm. (In case you didn’t know, it’s Friday the 13th.)

Got something you need to fix? Check out the December Repair Café at the Church of the Apostles at 86 Glasgow this Saturday from 10 am to 2 pm.

Ward 2 Councillor James Gordon will perform with his musical friends at the Heritage Hall at 83 Essex Street this Saturday at 7 pm. Get your tickets here.

Coming up this week on the GuelphPoliticast, it’s time to celebrate because it’s the 200th episode of the podcast, and the special guest is Mayor Norm Jary. We’ll recap Jary’s long-running career on city council, how he managed to wear two hats as a newsman and a mayor, and we get his thoughts on modern politics and his legacy.

Get the latest edition of the GuelphPoliticast on Wednesday.

Also on Wednesday, tune in to CFRU at 2 pm for another episode of End Credits. This week, Chris Aitkins from Nightmare on Film Street co-hosts as we review the family dramedy Marriage Story. We’ll also talk about Mena Massoud’s audition difficulties, new trailers, the latest on the Snyder Cut, and whether a TV show can be one of the best movies of the decade.

Then, Thursday at 5 pm on CFRU, it will be a new episode of Open Sources Guelph as Scotty Hertz and I look at the latest news in the Province’s fight with the teachers, talk about what’s going on with the U.K. election, and we’ll have interviews with the six Ontario Liberal Leadership Candidates.

Listen to all these shows any time by subscribing to the Guelph Politicast channel on your favourite podcast app at iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify.

No council meeting for the next couple of weeks, so we’ll start rolling out the end of the year recaps next week.

In the meantime, let’s set a holiday mood with the Baker’s Dozen (even though there was only 11 of them).  That’s the joke in the headline.

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And finally, feel free to reach out to be by email at adamadonaldson [at] gmail [dot] com, or find me on Facebook, Twitter, and, of course, GuelphPolitico.ca!

The Liberals are Coming! The Liberals are Coming!

I know, I know. They're already here because it's Guelph, right?

Welcome to the Guelph Politico Tip Sheet, a twice-a-week newsletter meant to “tip” you off about some of the important stuff going on in the Royal City. It arrives directly in your inbox on Tuesdays and Fridays.

The first leadership debate for the Liberal Party of Ontario will be taking place in Guelph on Sunday. (You do have to be a member of the party if you want to attend in person though.)

Members of the Ontario Secondary School Teachers Federation held a one-day strike on Wednesday despite getting a stern warning from the Minister of Education. According to the teachers at GCVI, they weren’t striking for a raise, they were striking for better conditions for the kids.

Emma Rogers has been hired as the new executive director of the Children’s Foundation. Rogers has a lot of experience in the philanthropic sector in Guelph as the former director of Community Relations and Engagement at United Way Guelph Wellington Dufferin, and as a co-founder of Guelph Gives. Rogers first day on the job is December 10.

East Enders are trying again to get Loblaws to start building. A new petition has been posted to Charge.org as a way to show the grocery giant that people really, really want a store on the land they own at Starwood and Watson.

Also in the News…

Martha MacNeil is the new Chair of the Upper Grand District School. Tough gig given recent events. (See above.)

Habitat for Humanity Guelph Wellington has released their notes from the second phase of the Affordable Housing Symposium.

According to the 10th annual Canada Food Price Report, Canadian families can expect to see a nearly $500 increase to their grocery bill net year thanks to rising meat, produce and seafood prices. Fun fact: the average Canadian household spends $12,667 per year on groceries.

It was like The Dukes of Hazzard Tuesday morning at the intersection of Paisley Road and the Hanlon Parkway when two unmarked police cars were rammed in the course of stopping a suspect they were following in a stolen jeep. Despite being hit by a taser, using the jeep to crash into two different police cars, and then nearly running over an officer, the driver jumped the median and got away. (The officers let him go out of concern for safety.) Be on the look out for a south Asian male wearing an orange toque in a stolen grey Jeep Commander.

The Politico Tip Sheet is open for anyone to subscribe, so if you know a friend or associate that might like to receive this newsletter, send it to them, and get them to click on the button below:

You might have remembered reading a couple of weeks ago that a court upheld new City of Toronto rules for short-term rentals like AirBnB, except now those people that brought the challenge to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal are saying that there were legal errors in the decision because the LPAT didn’t answer the question if the new regulations will actually improve housing.

Also in Toronto, Mayor John Tory told the Canadian Club on Wednesday morning that Torontonians should expect an increase to their city building levy to a cumulative nine per cent over the next six years, beginning with a 1.5 per cent increase in 2020. The Toronto levy was introduced in 2017 and was supposed to be increased 0.5 per cent per year till 2021.

Meanwhile, in Brampton, at least one city councillor raised warnings that the City’s government was blurred the lines between church and state when it heard delegations on declaring December “Christian Heritage Month.” Wards 3 and 4 Councillor Martin Medeiros, a practicing Catholic, also said that such delegations were taking council’s focus away from, “how we improve customer service at the municipality, how we ensure finding efficiencies.”

December 3 – Deliberations on the Tax Supported Operating Budget, Local Boards and Shared Services Budget.

It was a done deal in about six hours, and here’s how we got there:

*The Budget Impacts per Ontario Regulations 284/09 and Budget Public Sector Accounting Standards Reconciliation, and the 2020 Downtown Guelph Business Association budget and levy were both passed swiftly.

*On the funding for the Guelph General Hospital, Councillor June Hofland put a motion on the floor to approve $900,000 per year for five years, and then Councillor Christine Billings proposed an amendment to spread the payments over six years instead of five, which was passed unanimously. Councillor Mark MacKinnon tried to propose an amendment to separate the capital costs from the spending on equipment saying that the ask for equipment costs was basically council contributing to a charity, but the amendment failed. The Billings-amended Hofland motion passed 12-1, adding $750,000 to the tax bill.

*The main motion was put on the floor with council quickly adding the $60,500 for the hardscaping of medians and $100,000 from the reserve budget for security cameras at the Elliott.

*MacKinnon then put forward a motion to cancel the $5 up-front fee for the new transit smart cards, and only charge the $5 for replacement cards. There were some logistical issues to the ask because people will not be required to register the smart cards, and because staff didn’t know how much it would cost. Transit GM Robin Gerus did say that the card will be free for the first 90 days after its released, so people will be able to get the card for the first three months without paying the $5 charge. The motion failed.

*Another $170,000 was added to the Affordable Housing reserve, bringing this year’s contribution up to $500,000.

*Councillor Rodrigo Goller moved to spend $150,000 from the cannabis funding from the Province on another year for the Court Support Worker and Welcoming Streets Initiative, plus $150,000 from contingency reserves for another year of funding for the Support Recovery Room. Councillor Leanne Piper had ambivalence about using the contingency reserve for the SRR, and wanted to include it in the base budget, but other councillors were concerned that such a move would send a message that the City would cover the costs, and the responsibility, in perpetuity.

*Hofland moved an additional $376,900 for another shift for the ambulance service, but council was hesitant to invest more money at this moment while awaiting provincially mandated changes to amalgamate the various services. When and how this will happen is still unknown, and the motion failed.

*On the police budget, Billings moved a $500,000 transfer from the tax rate operating contingency reserve to offset the increase, but Councillor Mike Salisbury moved to defer that vote till other options were considered, and it passed. Salisbury then moved that the 9.8 per cent increase of the police budget be phased in over two years, but most on council were sold on the justification outlined by the Police Chief and the Police Board. Salisbury’s motion failed. When council came back to Billings’ motion, Salisbury then tried to increase the transfer to $1.2 million, but that motion also failed, as did a motion to increase the transfer to $700,000. Billings original motion passed in a close 7-6 vote.

*After a break, council passed an amendment to fund a project manger position from the 100 per cent Renewable Reserve, and to defer nearly $325,000 in costs to the 2021 budget.

*MacKinnon then tried to eliminate the expansion of the community bus to save $1.177 million. Hofland made the point that this came out of the recommendation of the service review, while Guthrie pointed out the expansion would allow the community bus to stop at KidsAbility, which is something that Mayor Cam Guthrie said that he’s been pushing for. The motion failed.

*Councillor Dan Gibson moved to reduce the transfer to the infrastructure renewal reserve fund by $1.1 million. Although it would create a $10 million hole in the 10-year capital forecast, Gibson said that the City would make that up easily with additional funding from upper levels of government, or even a change in interest rates. The rest of council was reticent about stopping the City’s momentum on closing the infrastructure funding gap. The motion failed.

*On the final vote, Salisbury asked to separate 1(g) of the budget motion, which was the approval of the local boards and shared services budget; Salisbury and Billings voted against it in a 11-2 vote. The final tally was 3.6 per cent plus an additional 0.31 per cent for the hospital funding, for a total levy increase of 3.91 per cent for 2020. The budget passed 10-3 with Bell, Billings, and Gibson voting against it.

Also coming up at City Council:

December 9 – Planning Meeting and Regular Council Meeting.

This meeting will see the decision report on one Gordon Street development, the statutory public meeting of another, and the new Commercial Build Form Standards will be discussed. Check out the agenda here. Before that, council has bumped its regular meeting of the month by a week, and you can check out that agenda here.

Both meetings will begin at 6 pm and so will the live blog, which you will be able to follow on Guelph Politico, or on Twitter @adamadonaldson.

December 11* – Special Council Meeting – Workshop on Transportation Master Plan and the Comprehensive Zoning Bylaw.

There will be no delegations at this meeting. Though it’s open to the public, this is a council workshop.

*Council goes on Christmas Break after this meeting.

Today is the 30th Anniversary vigil for the “Montreal Massacre” at Gilbert MacIntryre & Son Funeral Home at 6 pm. Before that, there will be a memorial at the Thornbrough Building on the University of Guelph campus at 3:30 pm.

There’s a “Coffee Chat” with MPP Mike Schreiner at Starberry in the Market Fresh plaza 3 pm on Saturday.

In local book news, you can go to the Bookshelf on Saturday and talk to Nicola Ross, the author of the local hiking guide, the Loops & Lattes Hiking Guide.

Former Environmental Commissioner of Ontario Dianne Saxe will be in Guelph on Monday to talk about “Waste and the Climate Crisis” at 6 pm at the River Run Centre.

If you missed any of this weeks shows, you can listen to them all, right now or any time, by subscribing to the Guelph Politicast channel on your favourite podcast app at iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify.

The commemoration of the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, and the Liberal debate on Sunday are two stops for the weekend.

Also this weekend, I’m going to binge watch the new Netflix series V-Wars for a review on Nightmare on Film Street. It’s about vampires.

Speaking of monsters, look who’s teamed up. #WorstCrossoverEver.

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And finally, feel free to reach out to be by email at adamadonaldson [at] gmail [dot] com, or find me on Facebook, Twitter, and, of course, GuelphPolitico.ca!

The Gift that Keeps on Giving (on Tuesday and Friday)!

It's been a long December, and it's only Day #3

Welcome to the Guelph Politico Tip Sheet, a twice-a-week newsletter meant to “tip” you off about some of the important stuff going on in the Royal City. It arrives directly in your inbox on Tuesdays and Fridays.

Health Minister Christine Elliot popped by Guelph on Friday afternoon to announce that funding for the Guelph and Area Ontario Health Team has been approved. The Government of Ontario hopes that better co-ordination between healthcare resources will be the end of hallway medicine, and the Guelph team seemed pretty excited about the possibility.

Also on Friday, there was another Fridays for Future protest in St. George’s Square, and if you missed it, there probably wasn’t anything there you haven’t already heard before, but to get 200 people out on a cold and dreary November day is an impressive feat in and of itself. It certainly says that climate change is an issue that’s not going away in 2020!

Unless something changes in the next 20 hours, there will be a one-day walk out of high school teachers in the Province of Ontario, and it will also likely close the elementary schools because Educational Assistants are part of the Ontario Secondary School Teachers’ Federation (OSSTF) union. Stayed tuned to the radio and social media on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning for up-to-date information.

Also in the News…

This is probably not the news that the Guelph Police wants people to be thinking about the day before getting their 9.8 per cent budget increase improved, but it looks like there could be a risk that the five years long, $34 million police headquarters could go over budget.

In what’s hopefully not a dark portent for the winter ahead, the City’s had to deal with two water main breaks in the last three days: one at Speedvale and the Hanlon on Saturday, and one at Eramosa Road and Meyer Drive on Monday.

In the fine tradition of the original Round Table (the King Arthur one), the gaming café The Round Table is harnessing its round table of area establishments to raise funds for area food banks. To learn how you can help, get in touch with Aron Murch at facilitator [at] lynnvander.com .

The Politico Tip Sheet is open for anyone to subscribe, so if you know a friend or associate that might like to receive this newsletter, send it to them, and get them to click on the button below:

Get the latest dine safe results in November’s second Mangez! column!

Toronto City Council voted last week to explore the possibility of using ranked ballots in the 2022 Municipal Election. The measure was passed in a close vote of 14-11.

Guelph Storm goaltender Nico Daws could become part of Team Canada as a member of this year’s World Junior Hockey team. Daws is one of four goalies invited to try-out, and even though I don’t know a lot about hockey, I know that this is a pretty big deal.

December 2 – Committee of the Whole.

In a relatively brisk affair, the final Committee meeting of the year saw a demonstration of the new data management system for local economic development, an update on the City’s implementation of the Waste Free Ontario Act updates, and there were a few questions about the year-end operating variance, which still looks on track to be about $2.2 million. This is key because there are going to be a lot of designs on that projected surplus as we head into the budget meeting today!

Check out the complete blow-by-blow of the meeting here.

December 3 – Deliberations on the Tax Supported Operating Budget, Local Boards and Shared Services Budget.

The meeting will begin at 2 pm and so will the live blog, which you will be able to follow on Guelph Politico, or on Twitter @adamadonaldson.

Also coming up at City Council:

December 5 - Deliberations on the Tax Supported Operating Budget, Local Boards and Shared Services Budget.  (If Required.)

December 9 – Planning Meeting and Regular Council Meeting.

This meeting will see the decision report on one Gordon Street development, the statutory public meeting of another, and the new Commercial Build Form Standards will be discussed. Check out the agenda here. Before that, council has bumped it’s regular meeting of the month by a week, and you can check out that agenda here.

If you want to delegate on any of the items at Council, you have until 10 am on Friday December 6 to get in touch with the Clerk’s Office. Here’s how.

December 11* – Special Council Meeting – Workshop on Transportation Master Plan and the Comprehensive Zoning Bylaw.

There will be no delegations at this meeting. Though it’s open to the public, this is a council workshop.

*Council goes on Christmas Break after this meeting.

The Guelph Chamber of Commerce is having an open house this Thursday at their office at 111 Farquhar St at 4 pm.

Friday is the 30th Anniversary vigil for the “Montreal Massacre” at Gilbert MacIntryre & Son Funeral Home at 6 pm. Before that, there will be a memorial at the Thornbrough Building on the University of Guelph campus at 3:30 pm.

There’s a “Coffee Chat” with MPP Mike Schreiner at Starberry in the Market Fresh plaza 3 pm on Saturday.

In local book news, you can go to the Bookshelf on Saturday and talk to Nicola Ross, the author of the local hiking guide, the Loops & Lattes Hiking Guide.

Former Environmental Commissioner of Ontario Dianne Saxe will be in Guelph on Monday to talk about “Waste and the Climate Crisis” at 6 pm at the River Run Centre.

Coming up this week on the GuelphPoliticast, we remember the events of December 6, 1989 with Sly Castaldi and Jessica St. Peter of Guelph Wellington Women in Crisis, and we talk about the struggle to end gender-based violence and what we can all do to make that idea a reality.

Get the latest edition of the GuelphPoliticast on Wednesday.

Also on Wednesday, tune in to CFRU at 2 pm for another episode of End Credits. This week, Peter Salmon co-hosts to talk about the new Rian Johnson-directed whodunnit Knives Out, as well as studios being allowed to own theatres again, the *method* of Tom Hanks, the “Decade of the Fan,” and Cineplex’s pan for the future of movie theatres.

Then, Thursday at 5 pm on CFRU, it will be a new episode of Open Sources Guelph as Scotty Hertz  returns, and so do a couple of our favourite topics as we catch up with the doings in Ottawa and Washington, plus we talk about the results of the Guelph 2020 Budget deliberations with a special guest.

Listen to all these shows any time by subscribing to the Guelph Politicast channel on your favourite podcast app at iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify.

We’re now officially in the last month of the year, and of the decade, and you know what that means: Lists, Lists, and more LISTS! At least three!!

Speaking of end of the year, Scotty Hertz and I are recording our year end OSG shows soon, including the annual awards. Any nominees for Best Politician, Worst Politician, Dumpster Fire of Good News Story?

Most of today is going be taken up with the budget, so I’ll just note again that today is “Giving Tuesday,” so would you, or someone you know, should consider giving to journalism?

https://guelphpolitico.ca/donate/

REMINDER: In a social media world, you new know who is listening, and who they might tip off:

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And finally, feel free to reach out to be by email at adamadonaldson [at] gmail [dot] com, or find me on Facebook, Twitter, and, of course, GuelphPolitico.ca!

Cannon Brawl Run

It's been over a century since Old Jeremiah saw a battle this fierce!

Welcome to the Guelph Politico Tip Sheet, a twice-a-week newsletter meant to “tip” you off about some of the important stuff going on in the Royal City. It arrives directly in your inbox on Tuesdays and Fridays.

The Ontario Secondary School Teachers Federation (OSSTF) has announced that they’ll be holding a one day walkout on Wednesday if they can’t reach a deal with the Government of Ontario by then. Education Minister Stephen Lecce is urging the union to stay at the table and not upset the lessons of the province’s high schoolers (even If it’s just for a day).

The pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong have found expression in Guelph around a peculiar local landmark. Old Jerimiah, the cannon at the centre of campus, was painted Sunday with a message of solidarity with protestors by the Hong Kong Student Radio Association, but the message was painted over the next morning, the University of Guelph’s Chinese Students and Scholars Association were accused of the repaint. On Monday night, emotions between the HKSRA and pro-China students at the U of G got hot, with the sometimes tense exchange being caught on video. Things seemed cool till Tuesday afternoon when a someone with their face covered carved “Death to the CPC” with a boxcutter on the Cannon. The HKSRA has since gone to Change.org to ask for the U of G to make an official statement of solidarity with the protestors in Hong Kong.

The Upper Grand District School Board unanimously passed a motion to declare a climate emergency at their meeting on Tuesday. The board will be creating a new committee to come up with recommendations to reduce the board’s carbon footprint.

Also in the News…

The City of Guelph is launching a new app that will give Guelphites tips and information to keep themselves safe in the event of an emergency. It’s called Alert Guelph.

Janice Folk-Dawson, the long-time labour activist and member of the Guelph and District Labour Council, has been elected executive vice-president of the Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL).

Updating two of the police news items from the last newsletter, at least one of the suspects from a shooting on Sunday has been arrested by Guelph Police. Meanwhile, a 23-year-old man has been arrested as the suspect that’s been dumping buckets of human waste on passersby outside university libraries in Toronto.

The Town of Asbestos, well-known for being named after that cancer-causing stuff dug up from the mine nearby, is looking to rebrand. Apparently, they’re having trouble attracting new investment with a name like “Asbestos.”

The Politico Tip Sheet is open for anyone to subscribe, so if you know a friend or associate that might like to receive this newsletter, send it to them, and get them to click on the button below:

Check out the highlights from the Ward 4 town hall or watch the live stream here.

Winter parking restrictions start on Sunday, make sure all your permits are in order.

Federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh has appointed himself as his party’s critic on Indigenous Affairs.

Donald Trump’s verbal slip-up at one of his rallies has been a boon for a Calgary company that gives away three pairs of socks for every pair that they sell. Yes, Virginia, there is a “Sock Rocket.”  

30 seasons and a movie? Danny Elfman, who composed the theme music for The Simpsons, recently said in an interview that he thinks the long-running show might be ending soon.

November 27 – Budget Meeting, Delegations for the Tax Supported Operating Budget, Local Boards and Shared Services Budget.

Council heard a dozen different delegations on Wednesday night concerning the 2020 Tax Supported Operating Budget, and the Local Board and Shared Services Budget.

Chamber of Commerce President Shakiba Shayani, TAAG Chair Steven Petric, and Transport Futures’ Martin Colloer all spoke to the need to enact transit improvements; representatives from the Guelph Community Health Centre, Stonehenge Therapeutic and the Welcome Drop In Centre all spoke to the need to continue funding on the initiatives from the mayor’s task force on homelessness; and, Dale Mills of the Guelph General Hospital Board petitioned for the requested renovation funds. A couple of delegates opted to appeal to council to not approve the 9.8 per cent increase for the Guelph Police Services budget.

As to what will happen at next week’s budget decision night, Councillor Christine Billings said that she’ll be looking at a way to get funding to keep the recently cancelled playgroups sponsored by CHC going in eight neighbourhoods. Councillors Leanne Piper and Rodrigo Goller both spoke to the desire to set up a reserve fund for harm reduction housing so that council can move swiftly if an opportunity comes up. Several councillors also discussed the possibility of spreading out the hospital’s request for funds over six or seven years as opposed to five, and what moves they can make to further fund new programs like the Support Recovery Room and the Welcome Streets workers downtown.

December 2 – Committee of the Whole.

In the last Committee meeting of the year, there will be a sign bylaw variance request, the update to the Waste Free Ontario Act, and the third quarter operating variance. Get all the details here.

The meeting will begin at 2 pm and so will the live blog, which you will be able to follow on Guelph Politico, or on Twitter @adamadonaldson.

December 3 – Deliberations on the Tax Supported Operating Budget, Local Boards and Shared Services Budget.

The meeting will begin at 2 pm and so will the live blog, which you will be able to follow on Guelph Politico, or on Twitter @adamadonaldson.

Also coming up at City Council:

December 5 - Deliberations on the Tax Supported Operating Budget, Local Boards and Shared Services Budget.  (If Required.)

December 9 – Planning Meeting.

This meeting will see the decision report on one Gordon Street development, the statutory public meeting of another, and the new Commercial Build Form Standards will be discussed. Check out the agenda here.

If you want to delegate on any of the items at Council, you have until 10 am on Friday December 6 to get in touch with the Clerk’s Office. Here’s how.

December 11 – Special Council Meeting – Workshop on Transportation Master Plan and the Comprehensive Zoning Bylaw.

There will be no delegations at this meeting. Though it’s open to the public, this is a council workshop.

December 16* – Regular Meeting of Council.

The agenda for this meeting will be released on Thursday December 5.

*Council goes on Christmas Break after this meeting.

The Mayor’s Tree Lighting takes place this Saturday at 7 pm in Market Square.

The 8th Annual Worlds AIDS Day Gala takes place this Saturday at the Frank Hasenfratz Centre for Excellence in Manufacturing at 7 pm. (You’ll need tickets to that though.)

Also on Saturday, Out on the Shelf is hosting an open house at their 10C Shared Space location from 11 am to 2 pm.

Next Friday is the 30th Anniversary vigil for the “Montreal Massacre” at Gilbert MacIntryre & Son Funeral Home at 6 pm.

If you missed any of this weeks shows, you can listen to them all, right now or any time, by subscribing to the Guelph Politicast channel on your favourite podcast app at iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify.

Fridays for Future will be holding a climate strike this Friday at noon in St. George’s Square.

Deputy Premier and Minister of Health Christine Elliott will be making an announcement in Guelph tomorrow concerning funding for the Guelph & Area Ontario Health Team. Guelph’s OHT is one of the first organizations of its kind to get funding as part of the Ontario government’s grand re-organization of health services.

The 200th episode of the Guelph Politicast is in the can. No, I won’t tell you who the guest is.

Tuesday is “Giving Tuesday,” so would you, or someone you know, should consider giving to journalism?

https://guelphpolitico.ca/donate/

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The Beaumont I Said It...

It was not exactly the funnest night at City Council.

Welcome to the Guelph Politico Tip Sheet, a twice-a-week newsletter meant to “tip” you off about some of the important stuff going on in the Royal City. It arrives directly in your inbox on Tuesdays and Fridays.

The combined team that brought the legal challenge to the Student Choice Initiative had a press conference at Queen’s Park Friday, and took a victory lap while the Ontario government tried to avoid talking about their options.

Kasper Transportation, a Thunder Bay-based private transit operator has announced that they will be launching their own route between Owen Sound and Guelph come February 2020. The City of Owen Sound will start running their own bus route as a pilot project in January thanks to the Province’s community transportation grant program, but Kasper is promising two or three trips per day versus one provided by Voyago, the City’s service.

A man ended up in Guelph General Hospital for serious but non-life threatening injuries after two men entered his house in the east end and shot him in the upper leg. Guelph Police say this was a targeted attack, and there’s no danger to the general public.

You’ve heard the expression, “It doesn’t rain, but it pours”? Well, what are we to make of the man that’s being accused of two instances of [checks notes] allegedly pouring “liquefied fecal matter” on people at York University.

Also in the News…

You can now have your say on the local trails, parks and recreation facilities. Go to the City’s website and supply your answers sometime before December 16!

Andrea Horwath and the Official Opposition NDP have announced their intention to fight Quebec’s Bill 21 by bringing forward a motion to condemn it in Ontario’s Legislature. Bill 21 is the famous law passed in the National Assembly earlier this year that bars people from wearing religious symbols while in a government job.

The Proud Boys, a far-right neo fascist organization that promotes political violence in defense of “western values” and to stop a “white genocide,” were apparently recruiting in Downtown Kitchener over the weekend. Or, at the very least, putting up some posters.

The Politico Tip Sheet is open for anyone to subscribe, so if you know a friend or associate that might like to receive this newsletter, send it to them, and get them to click on the button below:

Ward 2 Councillors James Gordon and Rodrigo Goller held a town hall at the Evergreen Seniors Centre on Saturday. You can go to Guelph Politico now and read the tweets, or watch the original live stream.  

The Guelph Storm’s 10-game winning streak was snapped on Saturday with a shoot-out in Hamilton.

Applications are now open for “established Canadian muralists” to apply to paint one of two new murals on the east wall of the East Parkade facing Woolwich Street. The deadline to apply is January 8.

A Goderich media company is making a documentary about Baywatch. Yes, you just read that.

November 25 – Regular Meeting of Council.

Harm Reduction Housing Update – The evening started with delegations and there was a good mix of people concerned about the construction of container homes at 106 Beaumont Cres for harm reduction housing, and those concerned about the state of homelessness in the city. One of the most persuasive delegations seemed to be Bryan McPherson who noted that the open space at 106 Beaumont was the only “park space” in the area. He tried to make the point that the neighbourhood was already underserviced by amenities, before adding a community of people with their own unique needs.

When the debate came back to council, there was some haggling over the original motion from Councillor Rodrigo Goller with Councillor Cathy Downer and Councillor Mike Salisbury both suggesting that staff could take more time to look at the options. Councillor June Hofland said that she didn’t think the project could move forward no matter how much time they gave staff, and Deputy CAO Colleen Clack more or less agreed noting that while the City is working with the County of Wellington on their own plans for harm reduction housing, the City lacks the in-house expertise and experience to go it alone. A motion to extend the deadline from January to February failed.

Next, Councillor Mark MacKinnon made a motion to replace “106 Beaumont” with “city-wide assets” in the original Goller motion. Clack noted that a lot of the work looking at City-owned real estate assets has already been done, but there’s still a lot of consulting to do with partner agencies, and only a few of the sites on the list of under-performing assets would be appropriate for such a project. Council voted on the original motion, and it failed 5-8.

Hofland then proposed a motion that that would direct staff to support the development of social housing in the event that a viable proponent stepped forward. Downer suggested that this is what the City was already doing, but Clack noted that a strong motion from council might jumpstart some interest from the community. Downer, Goller and Councillor Bob Bell all said that they felt that Hofland’s motion was more talk and no action.

Salisbury proposed an amendment to Hofland’s motion to direct staff to investigate options and processes required to facilitate harm reduction housing and report back by January 2020. At this point, Mayor Cam Guthrie said that the next phase of his task force on homelessness will tackle this very issue, and it would behoove council to take a breather for a couple of months while the experts work on options. Salisbury’s motion was amended to bring back a report by April instead of January, and it passed.

The full motion, with Salisbury’s amendment, was passed 12-1 with a Ward 1 Councillor as the lone no vote, except this time it was Bell.

Bus Allocation – Three motions were attempted to rein in the cost of the new service. Councillor Dan Gibson tried to pass a motion that brought the cost of the proposed #19 Hanlon Creek Business Park route down by running it at peak times only, and then by only running it Monday to Friday. Both motions failed. Councillor MacKinnon then tried to pass a motion to keep three of the five new buses in spare and not to expand the Community Bus. This motion failed too. The original recommendation from staff will now have to be ratified at next week’s budget meeting.

Motion of Support for the Municipal Intervention Application in the Supreme Court of Canada Case Opposing the Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act (Carbon Tax) – Councillor Leanne Piper said that a group of municipalities that have applied to be interveners on the Supreme Court of Canada challenge to the GGPPA are looking for support from other cities, but the Court has yet to rule on their intervener status, so this is a conversation to be had another day.

November 27 – Budget Meeting, Delegations for the Tax Supported Operating Budget, Local Boards and Shared Services Budget.

This is the public delegation night for the Tax Supported Operating Budget and the Local Boards and Shared Services Budget. If you have anything to say about the budget, this is your night to say it!

The meeting will begin at 6 pm and so will the live blog, which you will be able to follow on Guelph Politico, or on Twitter @adamadonaldson.

December 2 – Committee of the Whole.

In the last Committee meeting of the year, there will be a sign bylaw variance request, the update to the Waste Free Ontario Act, and the third quarter operating variance. Get all the details here.

If you want to delegate on any of the items at Committee, you have until 10 am on Friday November 29 to get in touch with the Clerk’s Office. Here’s how.

December 3 – Deliberations on the Tax Supported Operating Budget, Local Boards and Shared Services Budget.

This is decision night for the budget! The meeting will begin at 2 pm, there won’t be any delegations, just debating and voting.

Also coming up at City Council:

December 5 - Deliberations on the Tax Supported Operating Budget, Local Boards and Shared Services Budget.  (If Required.)

December 9 – Planning Meeting.

This agenda will be released on Thursday afternoon.

December 11 – Special Council Meeting – Workshop on Transportation Master Plan and the Comprehensive Zoning Bylaw.

December 16* – Regular Meeting of Council.

*Council goes on Christmas Break after this meeting.

A Ward 4 town hall with Christine Billings and Mike Salisbury at the West End Rec Centre takes place at 7 pm tonight!

The Mayor’s Tree Lighting takes place this Saturday at 7 pm in Market Square.

Fridays for Future will be holding a climate strike this Friday at noon in St. George’s Square.

The 8th Annual Worlds AIDS Day Gala takes place this Saturday at the Frank Hasenfratz Centre for Excellence in Manufacturing at 7 pm. (You’ll need tickets to that though.)

Next Friday is the 30th Anniversary vigil for the “Montreal Massacre” at Gilbert MacIntryre & Son Funeral Home at 6 pm.

Coming up this week on the GuelphPoliticast, we will learn more about the proposed Integrated Youth Services Network with two of the people who are organizing it: Kate Reed, the Project Manager, and Carrie Chassels, the vice-provost of student affairs at the University of Guelph. What’s involved with the project? What will it take to make it happen? Learn all that and more…

Get the latest edition of the GuelphPoliticast on Wednesday.

Also on Wednesday, tune in to CFRU at 2 pm for another episode of End Credits. This week, it’s a solo round as I talk about my Top 10 of the Decade and review the new Martin Scorsese film The Irishman.

Then, Thursday at 5 pm on CFRU, it will be a new episode of Open Sources Guelph and since Scotty Hertz will be on assignment again, I’ll stay in studio and talk to Ward 2 Councillor Rodrigo Goller and Guelph Police Chief Gordon Cobey.

Listen to all these shows any time by subscribing to the Guelph Politicast channel on your favourite podcast app at iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify.

The end of the month is this Saturday, which means part two of Mangez!, the Politico Calendar for December and the monthly council recap.

Any budget questions before next Wednesday? Let me know.

Speaking of the Youth Wellness Hub, there will be an update on the Guelph Wellington project this Friday morning at the Ariss Golf and Country Club at 7:30 am.

Next Tuesday is “Giving Tuesday,” so would you, or someone you know, should consider giving to journalism?

https://guelphpolitico.ca/donate/

Share Politico Tip Sheet

And finally, feel free to reach out to be by email at adamadonaldson [at] gmail [dot] com, or find me on Facebook, Twitter, and, of course, GuelphPolitico.ca!

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